Clark County Public Health officials encourage residents to prepare for wildfire smoke

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Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). center_img guestLabel Clark County Public Health officials encourage residents to prepare for wildfire smokePosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Tuesday, July 30, 2019in: Community News, Healthshare 0 Breathing smoke from wildfires isn’t healthy for anyone, but some people are more likely to have health problems when the air quality isn’t good VANCOUVER — With the warming weather and dry conditions, wildfire season is likely on its way and has already begun elsewhere in the state. Clark County Public Health is urging residents to take steps now to prepare for smoky days with unhealthy air quality.Breathing smoke from wildfires isn’t healthy for anyone, but some people are more likely to have health problems when the air quality isn’t good. Those at risk for problems include children, adults older than 65, people with heart and lung diseases, people with respiratory infections and colds, anyone who has had a stroke, pregnant women and individuals who smoke.Clark County Public Health officials encourage residents to prepare for wildfire smokeThe best way to protect your health when the air is smoky is to limit time outdoors and reduce physical activity. This is especially important for people at risk for health problems when air quality isn’t good. Photo courtesy of Clark Co. WA CommunicationsThe best way to protect your health when the air is smoky is to limit time outdoors and reduce physical activity. This is especially important for people at risk for health problems when air quality isn’t good.Here are some steps to take now, before air quality worsens from wildfire smoke:Know where to find information about local air quality. The Washington State Department of Ecology’s Air Quality Monitoring website has a map of air quality statewide. The map uses color-coded categories to report when air quality is good, moderate or unhealthy. The Southwest Clean Air Agency has current air quality information for Clark, Cowlitz and Lewis counties and may issue advisories when poor air quality is forecast.If you or a family member has heart or lung disease, talk to your doctor about precautions to take when air quality is unhealthy. Make sure you have the necessary medications, and ask your doctor how to manage symptoms and when to seek medical care.Develop a relocation plan in case you need to leave the area when air quality is hazardous.Consider purchasing a portable air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Make sure your vehicle has a HEPA-equivalent air filter.Know how to turn the air conditioner in your home and vehicle to recirculate to avoid bringing smoky outdoor air inside.Create a plan for alternatives to outdoor family activities. If the air quality is unhealthy, you may need to exercise indoors, find alternatives to outdoor summer camps or change vacation arrangements.Consider purchasing a respirator mask labeled N95 or N100 and learn how to properly wear it. People who must be outside for extended periods of time in smoky air may benefit from wearing one of these masks, if worn correctly. If the mask does not fit properly, it will provide little or no protection and may offer a false sense of security. These masks are not recommended for children or people with beards. People with lung disease, heart disease or who are chronically ill should consult a health care provider before using a mask.When air is smoky, here are some additional steps to take to protect yourself and your family:Limit time outdoors and avoid vigorous physical activity.Keep windows and doors closed.Turn the air conditioner in your home and vehicle to recirculate to avoid bringing smoky outdoor air inside.Don’t pollute your indoor air. Avoid burning candles, using aerosol products, frying food and smoking.Do not vacuum unless using a vacuum with a HEPA filter. Vacuuming stirs up dust and smoke particles.Use an air cleaner with a HEPA filter.Additional information:Clark County Public Health Smoke from Wildfires webpageWashington State Department of Health Smoke From Fires webpageInformation provided by Clark Co. WA Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyVancouvershare 0 Previous : Battle Ground’s National Night Out to feature new activities and family favorites Next : Herrera Beutler talks I-5 Bridge, Trump tweets in telephone town hallAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Name*Email*Websitelast_img read more

Columbia River broadcast team wins Emmy award

first_imgA near perfect broadcast by students leads to victory at Northwest Regional Emmy AwardsThis was it.The final chance.Jaelyn Gaylor wanted it to go smooth. A senior at Columbia River High School, she wanted to present the best broadcast she could for the nominating committee.Four of the members of the CRTV are shown here (from left to right): Keegan Duke, Jaelyn Gaylor, Miles Campbell, and Tarren Orr. CR Sports won a Northwest Emmy for its live sports coverage. Photo courtesy Janine BlackwellFour of the members of the CRTV are shown here (from left to right): Keegan Duke, Jaelyn Gaylor, Miles Campbell, and Tarren Orr. CR Sports won a Northwest Emmy for its live sports coverage. Photo courtesy Janine BlackwellShe had only started directing earlier in the season, and now CR Sports was about to broadcast its final game of the year.Up until then, every broadcast with Gaylor as the director had some sort of glitch, she said.“I really wanted to see if I could submit something from our team,” Gaylor said, looking back on that night, working the Columbia River-Woodland district basketball playoff game. “This was our last opportunity. I really wanted to get that last shoot in, one without having technical difficulties.”Gaylor had a headache that night. Like an accomplished athlete under the weather, her focus set in to do the job.“It helped my instincts kick in,” she said.Then the crew went the extra mile.“My team entirely came through and did everything they were supposed to do,” Gaylor said.On Saturday, the CR Sports team won an Emmy for that broadcast. “It was extremely exciting. When I saw my name up there, I really couldn’t believe it. I never thought I could be a director let alone a student Emmy director for the Pacific Northwest.”Jordan Ryan was the announcer for the CR Sports team that won a Northwest Emmy last weekend. Photo by Mike SchultzJordan Ryan was the announcer for the CR Sports team that won a Northwest Emmy last weekend. Photo by Mike SchultzCR Sports won for best sports-live event in the high school production category at the 57th annual Northwest Regional Emmy Awards.“We were screaming, yelling. It was joyous,” said Janine Blackwell, a teacher at Columbia River who runs CRTV. “When we did that particular production, everyone knew that it was a magical production. Everybody did what they were supposed to do. It just worked. We all knew that was our best work.”CR Sports honored for its production of a live sporting event.Joining Gaylor on the team that night: Jordan Ryan, the announcer, Tarren Orr with graphics, David Ryan on instant replay, as well as three camera operators: Keegan Duke, Emery Leifeste, and Michael Ryan. This is the second consecutive year CR Sports has won the category. Gaylor was a camera operator on last year’s winning team. Now, she is an award-winning director.The experience has taught her so much about completing a mission.“When it comes to a broadcast, or anything in this world, each member is an extremely important part to getting it done,” she said. “I relied on every single person. Every single job was so important. Parts that appear to be smaller still have a gigantic role in producing something you are proud of.”Blackwell agreed.“I can’t really say enough about how awesome these students are,” she said. “Every single one of them, just tremendous people. I know they will be able to achieve whatever dream they want in life. They are just great people.”The CRTV and CR Sports organizations are full of talent. CR Sports also was nominated for one of its football games in the fall. And CR News was nominated under the category of television magazine.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : Preparing cats for your return to work Next : BIAW lawsuit would stop L&I emergency rule to fine businessesAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Columbia River broadcast team wins Emmy awardPosted by Paul ValenciaDate: Wednesday, June 10, 2020in: Sportsshare 0 last_img read more

Clark County Council set to discuss ‘Safe & Sane’ fireworks rules

first_imgIf adopted, the new restrictions would take effect in July of 2022VANCOUVER — Clark County Council is set to discuss a possible change to the types of fireworks that can be sold and used in the unincorporated areas of the county. At a work session held Wednesday, a divided council decided 3-2 in favor of moving ahead to a public hearing on the proposed change, which would limit use and sale of fireworks to those labeled “safe and sane.”Fireworks at the Clark County Fairgrounds was one of the only public shows this year. Photo by Mike SchultzFireworks at the Clark County Fairgrounds was one of the only public shows this year. Photo by Mike SchultzIf adopted, the rule would make fireworks that fly more than a foot in the air, or more than six feet along the ground illegal to sell or use in the county.The earliest any change in the rules could go into effect would be July of 2022.Councilors Julie Olson, John Blom, and Temple Lentz supported holding a public hearing to discuss the rule change. Councilor Gary Medvigy and Chair Eileen Quiring O’Brien indicated they would prefer to wait longer before bringing up the topic.The most recent change to fireworks regulations in Clark County, which took effect in 2019, restricted their use to July 4 only throughout the unincorporated areas.John Young, fire prevention captain for the Clark County Fire Marshal’s office, said there were 19 citations issued in 2019 for illegal fireworks use.No citations were issued in 2020, though 56 warnings were handed out. Young said that was a conscious decision due to the strong “anti-police sentiment” this past summer following the in-custody death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.“The other thing that we noticed this year, the number of calls after midnight were less than years before,” said Young. “It’s like everybody shot off everything and were done.”Young also noted that the vast majority of noise complaint calls before or after the holiday came in the areas bordering the city of Vancouver, which has had a complete ban on fireworks use since 2016.A chart showing noise complaints due to fireworks in Clark County through this year. Image courtesy Clark County Fire Marshal’s OfficeA chart showing noise complaints due to fireworks in Clark County through this year. Image courtesy Clark County Fire Marshal’s OfficePermit fees for fireworks stands and tents brought in $9,572, said Young, against a cost of around $10,000 for enforcement.In urging his fellow council members to hold off on considering any further restrictions for now, Councilor Medvigy noted the “extraordinary time” that people are living through during the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced the cancellation of many traditional fireworks shows around the region.“We need more time to let the public adjust,” said Medvigy. “This year was kind of a wash because of the pandemic.”Quiring O’Brien agreed. “We need time to allow this new ordinance and our new way of dealing with fireworks in unincorporated Clark County to actually settle in,” she said, “for people to be able to realize what the new rules are.”“I don’t think that’s a reasonable argument,” responded Olson, noting that the only change was adjusting use of the fireworks to a single day. “We still sell them from June 28 to July 4. When you look at the last three years of just noise complaints, they’ve got consistently every single year.”According to the Fire Marshal’s office, noise complaints peaked in 2017 with 555, the second year Vancouver’s full fireworks ban was in effect. They dropped to 305 in 2018, then rose to 325 in 2019, and 404 this year. Most of those came on July 3.“We have not talked about the impact with these types of mortars and airborne fireworks in urban areas on our senior citizens,” Olson added. “We have pets and animals drugged and in closets because of the noise from these fireworks.”Chief among those sure to oppose any new rules will be area nonprofits. Many raise the bulk of their annual revenue from the sale of fireworks around the county. The Hazel Dell Lions Club, for instance, said in 2018 that 80 percent of its yearly budget comes from the sale of fireworks.Olson said she isn’t convinced those groups couldn’t find other ways of raising money.“It’ll take work, but they’ll have some time,” said Olson. “I think we could offer a full ban, which is what a lot of my constituents like, but this is a compromise.”The three councilors who spoke in favor of discussing the Safe and Sane restrictions noted that nonprofits would have 12 to 18 months before the new rules went into effect.“I would hope, too, that nonprofits that are relying on selling small munitions can find other ways to raise money,” added Councilor Lentz.The council has received a deluge of emails from constituents since the work session on fireworks was posted, the majority of which have been in favor of implementing further restrictions.“I was really hopeful that the changes that we made would reduce the number of calls and frustrated constituents, but it hasn’t,” said Councilor Blom. “It’s gone up every year, even within the city and from the constituents that are in my district inside the city limits.”This notice was posted at fireworks stands in 2019 and this year, notifying them that usage was legal only on July 4 throughout the unincorporated areas of the county. Photo courtesy Clark County Fire Marshal’s OfficeThis notice was posted at fireworks stands in 2019 and this year, notifying them that usage was legal only on July 4 throughout the unincorporated areas of the county. Photo courtesy Clark County Fire Marshal’s OfficeAny change in the rules is also likely to benefit nearby Native American tribes, such as the Cowlitz. As sovereign nations, restrictions on the types of fireworks they can sell would not apply.However, anyone caught using the illegal fireworks in the county could still face fines and likely have them confiscated said Young.A public hearing on the proposed rule change was tentatively scheduled for the Dec. 1 council meeting, which would be on a Tuesday at 6 p.m. Barring amendments to current COVID restrictions, the meeting would be held virtually, with public comment invited in advance, either online, or via letter submitted to:Clark County Council, c/o Rebecca MessingerPO Box 5000Vancouver, WA98666-5000AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouver Washare 0 Previous : Clark County Sheriff’s Office to move shooting range to Camp Bonneville Next : Five-Star Tattoo raises funds, love for Las Mesitas RestaurantAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Clark County Council set to discuss ‘Safe & Sane’ fireworks rulesPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Thursday, October 22, 2020in: Newsshare 0 last_img read more

Clark County pursuing no-barrier COVID-19 testing

first_imgClark County pursuing no-barrier COVID-19 testingPosted by Chris BrownDate: Wednesday, December 16, 2020in: Newsshare 0 The free clinics would likely be provided by Medical Teams InternationalVANCOUVER — People living in Clark County who’d like to get tested for COVID-19 but lack insurance or a doctor to recommend them may soon have an option.At a Board of Public Health meeting on Tuesday, Clark County Public Health Officer and Health Director Dr. Alan Melnick announced that they were nearing a contract to provide no-barrier testing.Medical Teams International volunteers Janet and Kul Jaswal swab young Julian for COVID-19 at a drive-up clinic. Photo courtesy Medical Teams InternationalMedical Teams International volunteers Janet and Kul Jaswal swab young Julian for COVID-19 at a drive-up clinic. Photo courtesy Medical Teams International“We’re going to be standing up a testing location, drive up as well as walk up,” Melnick told the Board. “It’ll be at Tower Mall. Our target date is January 4.”The announcement came two weeks after the last Board of Public Health meeting, during which racial inequality was deemed a public health crisis.During that meeting, Melnick faced questions about whether they would soon be able to provide testing to people who lack insurance, or a source of income to pay for office visits, since minority populations tend to be more impacted by the virus and also less likely to seek testing on their own.“We haven’t put the money into testing, because it would really drain the resources away from doing the case investigations,” Melnick said at that meeting.Since then, Clark County Public Health received more resources via a direct disbursement of CARES Act funding from the state Department of Health. That money opened the door to begin talks with a nonprofit to conduct the testing.Clark County Public Health Officer Dr. Alan Melnick. File photoClark County Public Health Officer Dr. Alan Melnick. File photoWhile nothing has been announced, Melnick said it would likely be a similar program to the one in Cowlitz County, where he is also the public health director. That testing program is run by the nonprofit Medical Teams International, through funding from the state.“It happened pretty quickly in Cowlitz County,” Melnick said at the Dec. 2 meeting. “So I’m hoping it will happen here as well.”At Tuesday’s meeting, Melnick said the free testing clinic at the Tower Mall site would be in partnership with the city of Vancouver, and likely run several days a week for at least three weeks.For those worried about the images of painful COVID-19 testing done with a cotton swab deep in the nasal passages, Melnick has some good news.“It’s going to be a non painful test,” he said.Medical Teams International uses a test that allows the person being tested to swab their own mouth, deposit the swab in a sterile baggie, and then return it. Results are usually available in 3-5 days.“It’ll be a PCR test, so an accurate test,” says Melnick, adding that they should be able to do between 500 and 1,500 tests per day.The Tower Mall site along Mill Plain was chosen because the city of Vancouver owns most of it, and it’s in a relatively central location with easy access by bus.Further details were expected to be released, along with a testing schedule, within the coming weeks.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : WATCH: Clark County TODAY LIVE • Wednesday, December 16, 2020 Next : Those in need blessed at Fort Vancouver Terrace ApartmentsAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

Another arrest made in Volkswagen diesel scandal

first_img PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca RELATED TAGSVolkswagenNewsAudi AGAutomotive ShowsAutomotive TechnologyCaliforniaCanadaCars and Car DesignClean Air ActClean Air PolicyCrime and LawCriminal TrialsCulture and LifestyleDee-Ann DurbinDetroitDomestic PolicyEnvironmental Issues and ProtectionEnvironmental PolicyEuropeFloridaGermanyGovernment and PoliticsHerbert DiessInternal Combustion VehiclesInternational Council on Clean TransportationJames Robert LiangMiamiNature and the EnvironmentNewbury ParkNorth American International Auto ShowOliver SchmidtPolitical PolicyPoliticsScience and TechnologyTechnologyThe Associated PressTrialsU.S. Department of JusticeU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyUnited StatesVolkswagen AGVolkswagen TiguanWestern Europe The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Trending Videos The complaint, dated Dec. 30, says Schmidt in 2015 misled regulators who asked why Volkswagen vehicles emitted higher emissions on the road than during tests. Schmidt “offered reasons for the discrepancy” other than the fact that the company was cheating on emissions tests through illegally installed software on its diesel vehicles, according to court documents.The complaint says Schmidt and other VW executives conspired to violate the Clean Air Act by making false representations about the environmental quality of their cars.Tests commissioned by the non-profit International Council on Clean Transportation in 2014 found that certain Volkswagen models with diesel engines emitted more than the allowable limit of pollutants. More than a year later, Volkswagen admitted to installing the software on about 500,000 2-litre diesel engines in VW and Audi models in the U.S. Later the company said some 3-litre diesels also cheated.After that study, Schmidt, in an apparent reference to VW’s compliance with emissions, wrote a colleague to say, “It should first be decided whether we are honest. If we are not honest, everything stays as it is.”He later emailed another executive with an analysis that listed possible monetary penalties from the Environmental Protection Agency.“Difference between street and test stand must be explained. (Intentpenalty),” Schmidt wrote, according to the complaint.RELATED Dee-Ann Durbin in Detroit contributed to this report. See More Videoscenter_img He faces an initial hearing in Miami Monday afternoon and likely will be taken to Detroit, where the Justice Department investigation is based, to face arraignment at a later date. It wasn’t immediately clear if he had a lawyer.In this handout provided by the Broward Sheriff’s Office, suspect Oliver Schmidt, an executive for Volkswagen poses in this undated booking photo. Schmidt was arrested January 7, 2017 in Florida and is expected to be charged with conspiracy and fraud in the Volkswagen emissions scandal. Schmidt was formerly a key emissions compliance manager for VW in the U.S. Motor Mouth: Here’s what Canadian owners get from VW’s DieselgateSchmidt’s bio for a 2012 auto industry conference said he was responsible for ensuring that vehicles built for sale within the U.S. and Canada comply with “past, present and future air quality and fuel economy government standards in both countries.” It says he served as the company’s direct factory and government agency contact for emissions regulations. The criminal complaint says Schmidt was promoted in 2015 as a principal deputy of a senior manager.Volkswagen said in a statement Monday that it is co-operating with the Justice Department in the probe. “It would not be appropriate to comment on any ongoing investigations or to discuss personnel matters,” the statement said.Herbert Diess, a member of Volkswagen AG’s board of management, appeared in Detroit Sunday evening to introduce a new version of VW’s Tiguan SUV ahead of the North American International Auto Show. He wouldn’t comment when asked if some Volkswagen executives refused to come to the auto show for fear of being arrested.“I’m here, at least,” he said.Asked about the Justice Department investigation, Diess also wouldn’t comment, but said he hopes it’s resolved “as soon as possible.”The company has agreed to either repair the cars or buy them back as part of a $15 billion settlement approved by a federal judge in October. Volkswagen agreed to pay owners of 2-litre diesels up to $10,000 depending on the age of their cars.In October, VW engineer James Robert Liang, of Newbury Park, California, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the government and agreed to co-operate with investigations in the U.S. and Germany. Liang was the first person to enter a plea in the wide-ranging case, and authorities were expected to use him to go after higher-ranking VW officials.A grand jury indictment against Liang detailed a 10-year conspiracy by Volkswagen employees in the U.S. and Germany to repeatedly dupe U.S. regulators by using sophisticated emissions software. The indictment detailed emails between Liang and co-workers that initially admitted to cheating in an almost cavalier manner but then turned desperate after the deception was uncovered.The complaint against Schmidt also references two co-operating witnesses in the company’s engine development, who have agreed to speak with investigators in exchange for not being prosecuted.The EPA found that the 2-litre cars emitted up to 40 times the legal limit for nitrogen oxide, which can cause human respiratory problems. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS DETROIT — The Volkswagen executive who once was in charge of complying with U.S. emissions regulations was arrested during the weekend in Florida and accused of deceiving federal regulators about the use of special software that cheated on emissions tests.Oliver Schmidt, who was general manager of the engineering and environmental office for VW of America, was charged in a criminal complaint with conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government and wire fraud.Schmidt is the second VW employee to be arrested as part of an ongoing federal investigation into the German automaker, which has admitted that it programmed diesel-powered vehicles to turn pollution controls on during tests and to turn them off in real-world driving. The scandal has cost VW sales and has tarnished its brand worldwide. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information.last_img read more

Rally shows its heart with Moroccan medical work

first_img Being unranked also allows you to delve a little deeper into the work the organization does in the area. Missing a checkpoint one day wasn’t a complete wash; I spent time at the day’s location of the medical caravan that is the hub of the Coeur de Gazelles. Serra’s daughter, Marina Vrillacq, is the president of the Coeur de Gazelles, created 17 years ago to bring teams of medical experts to those living in the most unreachable parts of this country. They use existing infrastructure in these communities – on-the-ground people who identify those who need assistance and help create conduits between the population and the medical help.Backed by European Volkswagen Véhicules Utilitaires, Aicha (A Moroccan food company) and ATOL Opticians, the Coeur de Gazelle partners with the Moroccan Ministry for Health and 50 volunteers in a large and growing range of medical specialties, including pediatrics, gynecology, general practitioners, dentistry, ophthalmology pharmacology, dermatology and screening for diabetes, cataracts and trachoma. In 2017, the organization reported:3,912 people received medical care 3,795 prescriptions were provided 9,610 medical services, including 4812 consultations and 16 surgeries 1,787 general medical consultations 690 pediatric consultations 283 gynecological consultations and 128 ultrasounds 417 diabetes tests 465 dental consultationsDuring the two weeks the Rally is in the area, the medical caravan moves daily, usually operating out of schools or public buildings. Doctors set up shop and see hundreds of people who often walk hours just to receive medical attention. Staff tell me some of the highlights: seeing someone have a pair of glasses put on for the first time, and truly seeing clearly. Kids receiving toothbrushes and toothpaste for the first time; parents learning how to spot and treat fever in children; how to cope with diarrhea, a constant threat in parts of the world without clean water; women receiving help with nursing their babies; all patients receiving instruction in preventative medicine. Organizers know who to expect – that fabulous local network again – and beyond medical care, clothing and things like wheelchairs are delivered, too. RELATED The Gazelle Rally blog: From start to finishWhen you actually see this happening, the crowds of people politely queuing as they wait to see a doctor, it’s hard to ever see the Gazelle Rally as just an off-road motorsports event. The tendrils of what the rally means to competitors – the tears, the exhilaration, the sweat, the anguish, the triumphs and the setbacks – reveal the heart of those who pay to play. Learning the Coeur de Gazelles provides ongoing medical support – transporting patients to city centres for more intense care, year round – reveals the heart of the organization.The Gazelle Rally is fiercely proud of its ISO 14001 certification, acquired in 2010 and the only motorsport event in the world to have it. The bivouacs sort waste to recycle, compost and incinerate, water and waste is filtered, and nothing is left behind. Water bottles are collected – a new project here creates buildings by filling the bottles with sand to form walls. There are no scars left behind on the landscape, and those who participate sign up to respect that ethos.I had my own reasons for wanting to participate in this exceptional rally. It’s touted as the adventure of a lifetime – and it is – but is also fundamentally alters your thinking about more than just yourself.   You may show up here uncertain of what to expect, but you cannot leave here unchanged. ‹ Previous Next › PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca The Rallye des Gazelle is the brainchild of Dominique Serra, a force of nature, who, 28 years ago, sought to create a rally that would be world class, environmentally innovative and deliver a key message: women can compete at the most extreme levels of motorsport. There is nothing watered down about this event. Women are tested for eight days to the limits of their physical, emotional, mental and intellectual capabilities. Serra tossed aside the traditional rule book of most rallies: the Gazelle Rally is about the shortest distance between two points, not the fastest one. Without the aid of GPS and navigational systems, it is an old-school test of your abilities with maps and compasses, rulers and coordinates. It is insanely difficult, both to navigate and to drive. advertisement We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. RELATED TAGSToyotaLifestyleNew VehiclesPeople The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car evercenter_img Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” Trending in Canada I was initially going to cover the rally solely as a report, but some brainstorming eventually put me in the driver’s seat of a Toyota Land Cruiser Prado, with my sister in the navigator seat. We are both new to this, but how better to understand what goes on in the mind – and heart – of a Gazelle, than to become one? Competing and reporting simultaneously immediately presented problems I hadn’t foreseen: I underestimated the toll the rally would take on me while overestimating my ability to wear two hats. The cost was getting unranked in the early goings, but Serra has thought that through, too. Unranked (a breakdown or call for help that falls outside the acceptable on-course fixes) may mean you’re out of the points contention, but you can still drive every day and continue. It’s a brilliant consolation prize, because once you start competing, a bad day simply makes you impatient for the next one to begin – at 4am.  Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Lorraine Sommerfeld, right, and her sister Gillian Lemos at the end of the Gazelles Rally.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2The point of the rally is to find the shortest distance for the day instead of being the fastest.Neil Vorano, Driving Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Gillian Lemos guides her sister Lorraine Sommerfeld down a sand dune.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2More dune bashing.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Digging out a car from sand is exhausting work.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Traversing sand dunes at the Gazelles Rally.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Dusk driving at the 2018 Gazelles Rally in Morocco.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Camping in the desert at night reveals a sky full of stars.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Guiding a Jeep down a difficult traverse.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2It’s expected that competitors help each other out on the rally.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Two competitors get their bearings before heading off again.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2A Jeep takes to the sand at the Gazelles Rally.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2The soft, blowing sand can be difficult to get over, even in a tough 4×4.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Gazelle competitors pore over maps in a giant tent at the bivouac before heading out in their cars.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2More calculations and map-reading inside the Toyota Prado.Neil Vorano, Driving Trending Videos See More Videos Women participate in the Rallye Aicha des Gazelle – the Gazelle Rally – for many reasons. Some are looking for something that tests them at the highest levels of their mental and physical capacity; some are celebrating milestones, battling demons, seeking redemption from a previous year, or simply trying something new. But for whatever brings them here, the Rally itself has very important reasons for existing.Unlike some sporting events that show up, put on a show and leave the tattered arenas behind them in their wake, the Gazelle Rally has formed long term partnerships in the most remote areas of Morocco to bring in medical care, education and job creation. The infrastructure is year round, meaning the work goes on long after the last 4X4s have packed up and headed home. Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2A young Moroccan gets fitted for glasses.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2A doctor with the Coeur de Gazelles tends to a young Moroccan.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Medical assistance from professionals is hard to come by in the Moroccan desert.Lorraine Sommerfeld, Driving Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2This wall is made with water bottles filled with sand.Lorraine Sommerfeld, Driving Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Some of the locals arriving for medical treatment at the Coeur de Gazelles post in Morocco.Lorraine Sommerfeld, Driving Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2The Coeur de Gazelles set up at a local post to treat people with various problems.Lorraine Sommerfeld, Driving Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Moroccans of all ages get checked out at the Coeur de Gazelles hospitals.Gazelles Rally Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Moroccans of all ages get checked out at the Coeur de Gazelles hospitals.Gazelles Rally COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Lorraine Sommerfeld, driver, and Gillian Lemos, navigator, at the 2018 Gazelles Rally in Morocco. last_img read more

Summer road trips can be good for the family – if you put your phone down

first_img See More Videos COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Trending in Canada RELATED TAGSNews Want a way to instantly double the time you spend with the people you love?Put down your phone when you’re with them.If you drop your kids at school each day but spend the whole time on your Bluetooth taking calls, you’re not with them. The time doesn’t count. We send a clear message to our children – and our friends – each time we drop our attention away from them and check an update, send a text, or answer a call: you may be in front of me, but I’m choosing to devote my attention to something else. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Bad driving habits rub off on kids, whether you know it or not Trending Videos ‹ Previous Next › The rules to follow when getting your kid a carBut over the years, the technology that has given us so much has stolen so much more. Multitasking isn’t a thing; it just means you do a lot of things badly at the same time. Our brains are wired to do one thing at a time if we want to do it well. You may think you’re solving a crisis at the office while you drive the kids to school, but that’s three things: work, driving, kids. We all know the result of people ignoring the road when they engage their brain outside the car, but you’re also ignoring what many consider the most important thing in their lives: their families. So prove it.Don’t get me wrong; screaming toddlers locked in child seats is a huge distraction, and a dangerous one. On trips, my mom used to be tasked with keeping us quiet so Dad could drive; it helped that she wasn’t scrolling through her Facebook feed when we went anywhere.The interconnectivity of our vehicles has brought outside distraction into one of the last bastions of escape, solitude even. Where once you could count on some disconnect time to talk to your passengers, listen to music or think original things, now the slow drip feeding tube of 24-hour electronic attention has reached the saturation point. News, traffic and weather updates? Sure. How many people liked that last picture you posted? Nonsense.Hang up and drive, indeed. Hang up and acknowledge your passengers.A recent article in The Atlantic delves into the dangers of too much screen time – for parents. We’re right to worry about how much time all ages spend peering into some device – preschoolers are reportedly at about four hours a day – but I would gladly have watched four hours of television at that age (and there were days nobody would have stopped me, I’m sure), so that argument needs a large asterisk beside it.I have no quarrel with how most parents adapt technology into their children’s lives; it’s not my business because I’m not a scientist nor am I their mother. Each generation has its thing, and it’s hypocritical to pretend the good old days were necessarily all that great. Cars are incredibly safer, you can shut howling kids up on a long trip by streaming a video and they can play things more engaging than the licence plate game.No, the problem is increasingly becoming not just one of how much time our children spend enthralled in a device, neck bent (in what can only be a chiropractor’s dream/nightmare) and warp speed thumbs, but us. What are we taking from them when we consistently remove our attention?Children are processing the world and you are the filter for that. What happens in front of our windshield has led to discussions as far ranging as homelessness, stunt driving, the aforementioned sex ed, and if a possum is an opossum. The thing is, you never know when the really important stuff will drop, because kids are like that. For every sulky, quiet ride, there has been an enlightening one – for one of us.Your attention is really all they want. And the most historic non-verbals- the teens – need you more than ever. I know they have their noses buried in their own devices and their own games. But by maintaining a tether outside the car that keeps you from being engaged within it, you risk letting the opportunities be lost forever. Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Road trips are a good opportunity to have a good family talk; if you can keep the smartphones down.  Getty The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Ditch the non-essentials. Share playlists, share conversation, share silence. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca advertisement I’ve had some of the best, and worst, conversations in a car. Especially with kids, there is something about the lack of eye contact that brings a different element to the fore. One time, my then 4 and 7-year-olds decided to ask where babies come from. I was trapped, which they knew, and we proceeded to have an enlightening, delicate ten minute conversation on the origins of life. Specifically, theirs.RELATED Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan”last_img read more

Hyundai Kona Electric tested at 415-kilometre official range by EPA

first_img PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Hyundai Kona Electric Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” Trending Videos On the safety-front, it comes with automatic emergency braking, blind-spot detection, active lane control, adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go, driver attention monitoring, and automatic high beams, and a head-up display will be available. RELATED TAGSHyundaiKonaElectricElectric CarsElectric VehiclesNew VehiclesElectric carsHyundai Motor Company Hyundai Motors’ all-electric vehicle, the 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric, has exceeded the company’s own expectations in terms of range, posting 258 miles (415 kilometres), according to the EPA.The official range rating is even longer than the 250 miles (402km) that Hyundai estimated when it unveiled the car at the Geneva Motor Show last spring. Kona Electric eclipses the 243-km range offered by its competitor Nissan Leaf and the 450-km range of Chevrolet Bolt. It nearly ties the Tesla Model S 75D’s 259-mile range.The vehicle shines in terms of MPGe as well, posting 132 MPGe in the city, 108 on the highway, and 120 combined, putting it among the most efficient electric cars available. A 7.2-kw on-board charger is capable of refilling its 64-kwh lithium-ion battery in about 9.5 hours. Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric  Hyundai See More Videos Hyundai has not released pricing, so it’s not clear which – if any – of those features may be standard, but it is expected to be the most affordable of a new wave of electric SUVs that will arrive later in 2019.Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Hyundai Kona Electriccenter_img The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Trending in Canada Hyundai advertisement Hyundai ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

First Look: 2019 Audi e-tron Quattro

first_imgCreated with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 The new Audi e-trong stands unveiled last night in Richmond, California, advertisement That impressive range comes by way of a 95 kWh lithium-ion battery pack comprised of 432 cells arranged in 12-cell modules in a double bed-sized, 34-cm high structure located under the floor of the SUV. By way of comparison, the Tesla Model X’s battery packs range in size from 75 to 100 kWh, while the 2019 Jaguar i-Pace’s is 90 kWh. Like Jaguar, Audi chose to develop and build its own electric motors rather than buy them off the shelf. Part of that decision was based on keeping and taking the automaker’s legendary Quattro traction system into the electric age in house, and part was based on development for future products (more on that later).Only time will tell if that ‘build-not-buy’ route was the correct decision, but judging from the specs released by Audi yesterday, their motors live up to the Audi badging. The front-mounted motor has an output of 125 kW with a 10 kW maximum boost potential, and the rear motor is rated at 140 kW and a 25 kW boost. That’s a combined power output of 265, or 300 at full boost, or in that old-school horsepower metric, 355 and 402 respectively. According to Audi that power spirits the five-seat SUV from a standstill to 100 km/h in 6.6 seconds, 5.7 seconds in full boost mode. Incidentally, that’s not really a mode in the sense you need to paddle shift or press a button; rather, you simply mash the accelerator (not the ‘gas’ pedal, of course) with the drive mode in the ‘sport’ setting.Audi has also set the charging bar high in its first all-electric production vehicle, allowing for a best-in-class 150 kW charge. Charge times range from 10 hours using the ‘Basic’ system (120v and 240v) 4.5 hours with the ‘Connect’ system (fast charger), and an impressive 30-minute charge up to 80 per cent of the battery life on a DC Charger (I say impressive as remember this is a very big battery pack). Audi has joined forces with public charging station provider Electrify America to expand its 150 kW and 350 kW network, and is offering U.S. e-tron owners free charging for a year after purchase. An Audi Canada representative said nothing is finalized for customers here yet, but said he wouldn’t be surprised if a similar deal was offered.Readers of driving.ca are well aware of the half-decade e-tron program—a search of the site prior to last night’s event found ‘e-tron’ references in no less than 108 stories—however seeing the vehicle in the flesh, especially flesh not speckled with so-called ‘camouflage’ paint, makes real all that hype-filled run-up. It’s a good looking SUV speaking the contemporary Audi design language, granted with a few stylistic flourishes inside and out, yet like the aforementioned i-Pace, it makes great efforts to stray not far from Audi DNA, particularly in the cabin. RELATED Next-gen Audi R8 could arrive as 1,000-hp electric car: report Last night’s reveal is just the start of Audi’s headlong charge into electrification. At the L.A. Auto Show in November the automaker will unveil the all-electric GT Concept, the production version of which is planned to hit showrooms in 2020. There’s also a two-door sportback in the works along with a compact, each slate for sale by 2020. Move ahead half a decade, and Audi says it will have 10 full EVs in its model lineup.In addition, Audi is working with partners inside its parent company Volkswagen on electrification—notably Porsche with its Premium Platform Electric (PPE) program—and outside the company, including a recently inked deal with Hyundai into hydrogen fuel cell research and development.Audi Canada has not released e-tron pricing yet, however the audi.ca website does have a reservation system with a refundable $1,000 deposit. Delivery of the first units is expected in early 2019. U.S. pricing was announced last night at US$74,800. A final word on Tesla’s founder in the context of the 2019 Audi e-tron Quattro. While it’s difficult to predict the future in these disruptive times, especially in the technology space, seeing the production e-tron up close it’s not hard to imagine Elon Musk’s contribution to the EV revolution will go down in history as that of a pioneer, a guy who laid down on the barb wire fence so that others could vault over him to the promised land. RELATED TAGSSUVElectricElectric CarsNewsPreview Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” Trending in Canada RICHMOND, Calif. — Before we begin with an overview of last night’s global reveal of the 2019 Audi e-tron Quattro production car, we’d be remiss in not acknowledging that tequila-popping, pot-smoking billionaire insomniac whose factory 50 miles down the Nimitz Freeway from here made this all-electric luxury vehicle possible.For if not for those Tesla sedans and SUVs rolling off the Fremont factory floor, there is no chance Audi—for that matter any luxury automaker—would have invested the billions of Euros required to bring a production EV to market. True, the case can be made, and convincingly, that without Elon Musk’s groundbreaking company the EV revolution would have come eventually, but certainly not in 2018. Maybe not even in 2050.Now, about that big reveal from last night on the San Francisco Bay waterfront. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTScenter_img Xb_je464″>PlayBMW has unveiled new all-electric vehicles in its i brand stablePlay2022 McLaren Artura | First Look | Driving.caPlay2021 Ford Explorer Timberline | First Look | Driving.caPlay2022 Honda Civic | First Look | Driving.caPlay2022 Hyundai Kona N | First Look | Driving.caPlayShanghai 2021 auto show sees raft of new EVsPlayAudi A6 e-tron | First Look | Driving.caPlay2022 Santa Cruz | First Look | Driving.caPlayFirst Look | 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS | DrivingPlay2021 Genesis GV70 | First Look | Driving.ca ‹ Previous Next › See More Videos Trending Videos We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. The e-tron is an all-electric, all-wheel drive SUV comparable in size to the Audi Q5, has a full-charge range of 400 kilometres, a maximum towing capacity of 1,800 kilograms (4,000 lbs.) and is loaded with new technology, including a really cool virtual wing mirror that incorporates a camera and screen in place of the traditional side view mirror (unfortunately, only Europe-spec e-trons get this as North America safety regulations forbid such technology. I am told Audi lawyers are furiously lobbying to change that.) Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22019 Audi e-tron quattro BMW has unveiled new all-electric vehicles in its i brand stablelast_img read more

Mom spanks child with belt after he steals her BMW

first_img In a follow-up video, Campero explains that Aaron is grounded for the rest of the year. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca RELATED TAGSBMWNon-LuxuryNew VehiclesNon-Luxury COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Ms Martinez of El Paso, Texas extracting her son from her stolen BMW.  Screenshot / Twitter The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever A video showing a mother in El Paso, Texas chasing down her son in a stolen car and slapping him with a leather belt has gone viral.Fourteen-year-old Aaron Martinez stole his mom’s BMW after shutting down the WiFi in the house to stop the security cameras from seeing him. He waited until his mom was away before taking her keys, then proceeded to take the car to go meet up with a friend.Obviously, that didn’t all go according to plan. The mother found out immediately and relayed to her daughter, Liz Campero (who had been documenting the heist on social media) that she was coming after Aaron. Trending in Canada “She told me she was on her way home and to grab her belt,” Campero told ABC13 news. In a video taken by Campero, you can hear the mother talking to Aaron’s friend’s mother, who informed the Martinez family of the heist. They found out that the first stop was Aaron’s girlfriend’s house, so they went there first.“The girlfriend called his best friend and there was another girl with them,” Campero explained.The mother and sister caught up with Aaron after waiting in a parking lot near a street they knew he would drive down, which is when the mother proceeded to chase him and yell “Pull over now!” making Aaron pull over to the side of the road. “Give me the belt,” she said to Campero who was still recording. The mother then proceeds to open the driver’s door of her new BMW and slaps the hell out of her son by the side of the road.“She said when she opened the door, he was smirking, and as soon as he saw the belt, he wiped the smile off his face,” Campero explains. See More Videos Trending Videos Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” advertisement ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more